Jacques Cytrynovitch

Born in Odziwal, Poland (1893 - 1942)

Jacques Cytrynovitch received a traditional Jewish education as well as a vocational education. During World War I, he was interned in a coal mine by the Germans, but he subsequently participated in the November 1918 revolution in Berlin. Following the war, he moved to Paris in response to a long-standing invitation by Naum Arenson, who had met him before the war and encouraged him to come to Paris. Cytrynovitch worked with Arenson and Bourdelle, creating sculptures that were true to nature, with an inclination toward the monumental. He exhibited his work at the Salon d'Automne and in various galleries. Work by Cytrynovitch can be found in private collections and museums, including the Philadelphia Art Museum.

Cytrynovitch was arrested in July 1941 as he was trying to cross the demarcation line into southern France, which was still free. He was deported to Auschwitz, where he died on July 27, 1942.

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Jacques Cytrynovitch
Jacques Cytrynovitch
Young Girl Combing Her Hair
bronze, 34.5x24.5x13 cm.